Animal waste technology project unveiled in MD

Animal waste technology project unveiled in MD

Governor Larry Hogan and Agriculture Secretary Joe Bartenfelder recently toured the Murphy family’s Double Trouble Farm

New manure process unveiled at Fair Oaks

New manure process unveiled at Fair Oaks

Midwestern BioAg, a Wisconsin-based company, recently unveiled a new manufacturing process that transforms dairy manure into a uniform, dry fertilizer granule

Closed-loop concept could be future of sustainable farms

Closed-loop concept could be future of sustainable farms

Dr. Eunsung Kan sees his concept of a closed-loop dairy farm – which reuses wastewater, emits zero waste and powers itself on manure – as the future.

Ontario potato crop hit hard by 2016 weather

Ontario potato crop hit hard by 2016 weather

Each growing season is different, but the 2016 season was unlike any season seen before in Ontario.

North American Manure Expo coming to SD in 2018

North American Manure Expo coming to SD in 2018

South Dakota State University and SDSU Extension are pleased to announce South Dakota was recently selected to host the 2018 North American Manure Expo.

video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 11, 2016...
Which glyphosate-resistant weed is most problematic to Ontario growers? Peter Sikkema answers this question and provides control and management strategies for dealing with glyphosate resistance in this exclusive interview from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 4, 2016...
How can farmers preserve the herbicides they are so dependant on? Neil Harker, a weed scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lacombe, Alta., suggests strategies to help slow down herbicide resistance in this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 27, 2016...
Jason Norsworthy, a professor in the department of crop, soil and environmental sciences at the University of Arkansas, spoke at the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit about the status of herbicide resistance in the United States. In this exclusive video, Norsworthy offers insight on the future of herbicide resistance, and suggestions for best management practices.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 20, 2016...
Harvest weed seed control is a management practice that has seen great success in Australia. In this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit, Breanne Tidemann and Michael Walsh discuss the potential for adapting this strategy to Canada, and the benefits and challenges of harvest weed seed control.

Equipment

Seeding/Planting

. Horsch introduces 40-foot RT Joker model

June 13, 2016, Mapleton, N.D. — To meet growing demand from customers, Horsch LLC has introduced the Joker RT40, a 40-foot-wide version of its popular RT Joker Series. The new model features a five-section design with adjustable down pressure to closely follow ground contours and evenly distribute the machine's weight for ensuring precise tillage depths. It also folds to a transport width of 15 feet, 8 inches for transport down narrow roads and for easy maneuverability. The RT40 offers the same agronomic benefits as other RT Joker models for residue management and seedbed preparation, as well as incorporating chemicals, fertilizer and manure. Its 20-inch notched blades provide precise soil engagement and residue sizing, while optimal spacing between the front and rear ranks allows for maximum soil and residue throughput. Additionally, the RollFlex Finishing System consolidates the soil to accelerate residue decomposition, create a firm seedbed and retain moisture for rapid and even crop emergence. "Our engineering team has done an amazing job to develop a 40-foot Joker that maintains the same proven agronomic principles of our current Joker RT models and have it in narrow transport width," said Jeremy Hughes, product manager at Horsch LLC. "The new five-fold design gives customers a wider working width along with terrain following attributes without sacrificing any performance. That's something competitive 40-foot units can't say." Other standard features on the RT40 include heavy-duty walking tandem caster gauge wheels, easy depth control adjustment, a hydraulic hitch jack and a RollFlex accumulator system. The unit requires tractor horsepower ratings of 500 or more to operate. Visit www.horsch.com for more information.    

Spraying

Salford's new air boom applicator. Salford Group unveils pull-type pneumatic boom applicator

June 15, 2016 - Salford Group unveiled what it says is the largest pull-type pneumatic boom applicator on the planet. The whopping prototype is being shown for the first time in public at Canada's Farm Progress Show this week in Regina. The prototype applicator was originally conceived for the Western Canada market as a large capacity air boom applicator that would combine the benefits of fewer stops for refilling with the wind-resistant nutrient delivery characteristics of an air boom. The concept was first suggested by customers at the 2015 Canada's Farm Progress Show when both an 8 ton Salford Valmar 8600 pull-type pneumatic boom applicator and a Salford BBI Magna-Spread Ultra spinner spreader with a 480 cu.ft. struck level capacity hopper sat on display in the Salford booth. Based on this feedback, Salford immediately began planning how it could integrate the 8600 air boom system with the MagnaSpread Ultra hopper and chassis at its Ontario headquarters and R&D center. It also began looking for a western Canadian customer it could partner with for running the initial prototype. Through the territory manager for the area, Glenn Herperger, Sharpe's Soil Services Ltd. in Moosomin, Sask. showed interest in the tool for commercial application. The machine would provide a much higher capacity than a commercial floater truck (480 cu-ft stuck capacity vs. 350 cu-ft on a standard floater truck), it can do 14 mph with 66-foot booms which translates into 100 acres an hour, and it would come at a fraction of the cost of a floater truck which typically range from $400,000 to $500,000 or more. Sharpe's agreed to take delivery of the first prototype for use in their fleet for the fall 2015 application season. "We completed the design and construction of the first prototype last summer with minimal modification to the MagnaSpread Ultra chassis. The two technologies married together well," said project manager Brad Baker. "We were also able to use much of the existing hydraulics package from the Ultra. It was even ISObus ready, using a Tee-Jet IC-18 ISObus controller that was already offered with the MagnaSpread Ultra." Before delivery, Salford performed testing on the basic functionality of the prototype at its Ontario plant. This included verifying the tool could produce consistent output across the boom swath and the target minimum and maximum rates specified up front could be attained. It also included running the unit in the field to observe boom stability and energy transfer from the frame to the boom over rough terrain. Once Salford was satisfied with the initial tests and observations, it transferred the unit to Saskatchewan to begin field trials with Sharpe's. After the fall season with Sharpe's, Salford moved the prototype for field trials elsewhere in Saskatchewan to ensure it was tested with an array of customers with different needs. "Salford is evaluating the product for potential production in the near future," said Geof Gray, CEO of Salford Group Inc. "It will slot in above the 8600 product line as the flagship series of air boom applicators." "I am most proud because it is one of the best examples of the combined efforts of Salford, Valmar and BBI as one coherent, collaborative and innovative organization," he continued.

Poultry Equipment

The Tempo sensor provides precise eggshell temperature data via a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) which is used in healthcare services and medical research where precise accuracy is required New tracking tool monitors eggshell temperature in the hatchery in real time

March 10, 2016 - Chick Master is introducing a new tracking tool to monitor eggshell temperature in real time. The new tool, called Tempo, is now available with Chick Master’s Maestro Hatchery Management System on all Avida Symphony setters. The information provided by Tempo can aid hatcheries to improve chick quality. The current needs of the industry demand better tools to obtain maximum hatch results. Chick Master’s proven Maestro System is an intelligent management system that ensures communication, data monitoring and control of incubation and ventilation equipment to maximize hatchery performance. Robert Holzer, president of Chick Master said, “One of the key factors influencing high quality chick development is proper embryo temperature during the incubation period. Tempo now adds a new dimension by providing the user the ability to monitor egg shell temperature in each zone in the most uniform single stage setter today.” Tempo provides precise eggshell temperature data via a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) which is used in healthcare services and medical research where precise accuracy is required. The temperature readings are not affected by the radiating heat that surrounds the targeted egg providing more precise temperature information allowing the user to better evaluate and monitor optimal embryo development. Information provided by Tempo can be viewed as a graph on the Maestro Hatchery Management System or as a real time value on the machine’s touch screen. This feature will enable the user to modify the step program for factors including breeder flock age, egg size, fertility and season of the year to ensure proper temperature during the entire incubation process.

AgAnnex Events