Canadian Poultry

Canadian Poultry
Joint chicken genome project gets UK Innovation Grant

Joint chicken genome project gets UK Innovation Grant

A joint project by Cobb Europe and the Roslin Institute has been awarded a grant of almost $1 million for genome biobanking

EFC awarded Crystal Egg Award by International Egg Commission

EFC awarded Crystal Egg Award by International Egg Commission

The Egg Farmers of Canada is the 2014 recipient of the Crystal Egg Award for outstanding commitment to corporate and social responsibility by the IEC

Precision Feeding

Precision Feeding

Controlling individual bird feed intake to match body weight targets can realize genetic potential

James and Brenda McIntosh recognized with award

James and Brenda McIntosh recognized with award

James and Brenda McIntosh are the 2014 recipients of the Ed McKinley Poultry Worker of the Year award

Gilbert Matheson

Gilbert Matheson

He’s been eagerly crossing the road between his childhood home and his grandparents farm in southern New Brunswick since he was a toddler. Gilbert Matheson was by his grandparents’ side, gathering eggs, tending cattle and working fields. Today, Gilbert and his wife, Stacy, call the farmstead at Grant’s Breeder Farm Ltd. in Kars, N.B. their own and cross that barnyard alongside their five children as they carry on the family farm.

video
North American Manure Expo comes to Canada...
For the first time ever, the North American Manure Expo is being hosted within a Canadian province. The annual show is being held August 20 and 21, 2013, at the University of Guelph’s Arkell Research Station, located near Guelph, Ontario. So, what's a Manure Expo and why should you attend? This video will provide all the dirt.
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Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitatio...
Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitation
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The population explosion...
With the world's population increasing exponentially and farmland staying the same, BASF took to the streets to ask consumers if this trend is sustainable.
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Lily Tamburic...
Lily Tamburic

Production

(L-R) Mark Belanger, Kurt Bartman, Melissa Wiens Barkman, and Marianne Bonner Three young farmers awarded look at Aviagen's operations

October 15, 2014 - Aviagen recently announced that three young poultry farmers from Canada visited the company’s world headquarters to get a first-hand look at the most advanced poultry breeding operation in the world. This year, three farmers — all selected from the 2014 Canadian Broiler hatching Egg Producers Association’s (CBHEPA) young farmer’s program — spent a week at Aviagen facilities in Huntsville, Alabama and the surrounding areas.  This year’s CBHEPA young farmer’s program participants are Kurt Barkman and Melissa Wiens Barkman, both of Bredenbury, Saskatchawan, and Marianne Bonner from Chilliwack, British Columbia. The visit allowed the Barkmans and Bonner to tour an Aviagen farm and hatchery, in addition to the company’s product development facility. In their tours and meetings the Barkmans and Bonner gained in-depth knowledge of the US poultry industry, biosecurity practices, production planning, shipping and export processes, Ross® brand broiler/breeder traits and development, and Aviagen’s commitment to sustainability and animal welfare. Canadian Technical Manager Mark Belanger hosted the tours and meetings on behalf of Aviagen. “The young farmer’s tour at Aviagen is allowing me to gain more understanding of the genetics behind the birds and also the performance improvements of the Ross breeder as a result of the natural selection process,” said Kurt Barkman, whose father built the Barkman family’s first breeder barn shortly after Kurt was born. “I have always wanted to see the place where our birds originate from and meet some of the people behind the scenes.” For Bonner, whose farming operation produces 30 acres of blueberries in addition to breeders and broilers, joined her parents’ poultry business after first starting a career as a certified dental assistant. “Over the years, my sisters left and I remained,” said Bonner, who manages both breeders and pullets. “I attend every breeding and production seminar I can and have a real zest for knowledge. On any day you will find me walking through the barns, working the egg belts, balancing the finances, and any other chore that is necessary to keep the farm running as smooth as possible.” “These three young farmers exemplify the industrious and creative people who will shape the poultry industry of tomorrow. It’s an honour to show them our operations and give them an opportunity to get to know today’s leaders at Aviagen. From a breeder, broiler and blueberry farmer to an enthusiastic husband-and-wife poultry farming team, this year’s recipients truly impresses,” says Aviagen’s Canadian Regional Business Consultant, Scott Gillingham.  

Profiles

(LtoR) John Penner,  EFC Chief Executive Officer Tim Lambert, Kurt Siemens, EFC Chairman Peter Clarke, and Marcel Laviolette were some of the farmers present at EFC Downtown diner. Social Responsibility

  Geneve Newcombe and her husband Craig, egg farmers in Port Williams, Nova Scotia, feel strongly about teaching their children about the value of giving back to the community. So when Geneve heard that Egg Farmers of Canada was a sponsor of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation CIBC Run for the Cure, she didn’t hesitate: she and her three children, all in their late teens and early 20s, signed up to take part in the run in Halifax. The family has done the run twice now — happy to do something for others, and pleased that Egg Farmers of Canada is a sponsor of the event. Social responsibility comes naturally to egg farmers. Right from the beginning, EFC has always strived to incorporate social responsibility into all aspects of its organization. Tradition of Agriculture“I believe that social responsibility is rooted in our traditions as an agricultural industry,” says Peter Clarke, chairman of Egg Farmers of Canada. “When egg farmers came together in the 1970s to develop a self-regulating supply management system, they were demonstrating a willingness to work together for the common good of consumers and farmers. They also understood there was a need to earn the trust of their stakeholders by operating in a socially responsible manner. Research has confirmed this. Through donations, fundraising, sponsorship, volunteering and taking part in events, nine out of ten farmers are giving back. Across the country, they are strong contributors to their communities. Deep Roots“Because most egg farms in Canada are family-owned and have often been operating through several generations, our farmers are deeply rooted in and committed to giving back to their communities,” adds Peter Clarke. Egg boards are also strong community supporters. Egg boards and EFC contribute more than $1 million a year to causes through donations, fundraising and sponsorship of community events and organizations. Collectively, they support close to 200 community programs, causes, charities and events. EFC has been collaborating with Food Banks Canada for more than two decades, and over the years it has donated millions of eggs to the organization — more than one million last year alone. At one of its recent events in Ottawa, Egg Farmers of Canada hosted a successful Downtown Diner near Parliament Hill. EFC served egg sandwiches created by Marc Doiron, a chef and owner of the local restaurant Town, to parliamentarians, their staff and the public; in return, the organization encouraged donations to Food Banks Canada and added their own donation. As a result EFC was able to present Food Banks Canada with a $10,000 cheque. Earlier this year, Egg Farmers of Canada announced a new partnership with Breakfast Club of Canada, an organization that gives children access to a nourishing breakfast. Supply ManagementGeneve Newcombe says the system of supply management is part of the underpinning of egg farmers’ commitment to their community. By giving egg farmers an income they can count on, the system brings stability to the industry and enables farmers to think about more than just the future of their farm. “Stability helps keep you anchored in the community,” she says. And being anchored in the community makes it easier to give back.    

Policy/Business

(L-R) Mark Belanger, Kurt Bartman, Melissa Wiens Barkman, and Marianne Bonner Three young farmers awarded look at Aviagen's operations

October 15, 2014 - Aviagen recently announced that three young poultry farmers from Canada visited the company’s world headquarters to get a first-hand look at the most advanced poultry breeding operation in the world. This year, three farmers — all selected from the 2014 Canadian Broiler hatching Egg Producers Association’s (CBHEPA) young farmer’s program — spent a week at Aviagen facilities in Huntsville, Alabama and the surrounding areas.  This year’s CBHEPA young farmer’s program participants are Kurt Barkman and Melissa Wiens Barkman, both of Bredenbury, Saskatchawan, and Marianne Bonner from Chilliwack, British Columbia. The visit allowed the Barkmans and Bonner to tour an Aviagen farm and hatchery, in addition to the company’s product development facility. In their tours and meetings the Barkmans and Bonner gained in-depth knowledge of the US poultry industry, biosecurity practices, production planning, shipping and export processes, Ross® brand broiler/breeder traits and development, and Aviagen’s commitment to sustainability and animal welfare. Canadian Technical Manager Mark Belanger hosted the tours and meetings on behalf of Aviagen. “The young farmer’s tour at Aviagen is allowing me to gain more understanding of the genetics behind the birds and also the performance improvements of the Ross breeder as a result of the natural selection process,” said Kurt Barkman, whose father built the Barkman family’s first breeder barn shortly after Kurt was born. “I have always wanted to see the place where our birds originate from and meet some of the people behind the scenes.” For Bonner, whose farming operation produces 30 acres of blueberries in addition to breeders and broilers, joined her parents’ poultry business after first starting a career as a certified dental assistant. “Over the years, my sisters left and I remained,” said Bonner, who manages both breeders and pullets. “I attend every breeding and production seminar I can and have a real zest for knowledge. On any day you will find me walking through the barns, working the egg belts, balancing the finances, and any other chore that is necessary to keep the farm running as smooth as possible.” “These three young farmers exemplify the industrious and creative people who will shape the poultry industry of tomorrow. It’s an honour to show them our operations and give them an opportunity to get to know today’s leaders at Aviagen. From a breeder, broiler and blueberry farmer to an enthusiastic husband-and-wife poultry farming team, this year’s recipients truly impresses,” says Aviagen’s Canadian Regional Business Consultant, Scott Gillingham.