NFACC offers videos explaining Code of Practice development process

NFACC offers videos explaining Code of Practice development process

Two whiteboard videos explaining the Code development process are now available from the National Farm Animal Care Council’s (NFACC) You Tube channel

From Pig to Pump Smithfield tackles sustainability

From Pig to Pump Smithfield tackles sustainability

What happens when you bring an alternative energy company and pig farms together? Well if the farm owner is Smithfield Foods Hog Production in northern Missouri, which finishes two million pigs a year, and the energy company is Roeslein Alternative Energy (RAE), the answer is a lot of renewable natural gas.

Controlling oat crown rust

Controlling oat crown rust

“Crown rust is probably the most important disease of oats in Canada, from Quebec through to Saskatchewan,” says Albert Tenuta, a plant pathologist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

Tackling the yield challenge

Tackling the yield challenge

In 2013, eastern Canadian potato growers were concerned: they were not seeing the yield increases experienced by growers throughout the rest of North America.

video
Honey Bee AirFLEX...
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North American Manure Expo comes to Canada...
For the first time ever, the North American Manure Expo is being hosted within a Canadian province. The annual show is being held August 20 and 21, 2013, at the University of Guelph’s Arkell Research Station, located near Guelph, Ontario. So, what's a Manure Expo and why should you attend? This video will provide all the dirt.
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Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitatio...
Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitation
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The population explosion...
With the world's population increasing exponentially and farmland staying the same, BASF took to the streets to ask consumers if this trend is sustainable.

Sustainability

Tom Dietz. Sexy ideas won’t slow climate change if people don’t buy in and buy them

May 25, 2016 - As governments and researchers race to develop policies and technologies to make energy production more sustainable and mitigate climate change, they need to remember that the most sophisticated endeavors won’t work if they’re not adopted. That’s the viewpoint of Thomas Dietz, Michigan State University (MSU) professor of sociology and environmental science and policy, and co-editors in “Towards a science of climate change and energy choices,” their introduction to a new collection of papers on how to address the linked problems of energy sustainability and climate change jointly published by the journals Nature Energy and Nature Climate Change on May 9. Dietz is also a faculty member in the MSU Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability. “The special issue was prompted in part by the Paris Agreements where 177 countries have agreed to take action on climate change,” Dietz said. “To meet the goals set by those agreements, we will need to draw on what we know about human behavior, about how organizations work, about how policies unfold. Insights from the social sciences can help achieve those goals and at the same time help insure that people throughout the world have access to affordable energy.” The two linked special issues bring together an international group of social scientists to reflect on the state of the art in energy social science research. The topics covered are broad: how best to structure international treaties on climate change how to encourage more energy efficiency by households and organizations how communities react to new energy facilities like wind farms Dietz, along with co-editors Benjamin Sovacool and Paul Stern, synthesize the papers in the special issue. “The overall message is that we know enough to have much more effective policies on energy use and climate change, and that the design of sound policies has to be based on social science research,” Dietz said. “The starting point for most policies and programs is to assume people make carefully thought out decisions with all the information they need. But we don’t usually do that—we are busy, some of the tradeoffs we have to make are complicated, and it can be hard to get the information we need. So we have to design policies for real people and real organizations. We have to make it easy to make the best choice.” Dietz also pointed out that people are not just consumers when it comes to energy. They are also citizens, neighbors, members of a community and likely work in organizations. There are many ways and places people can influence decisions about energy use, from buying products from companies that pledge sustainability, to voting for politicians who offer tax incentives for residential solar panels. “A bias still exists within industry, the academy, and even policymaking circles that we have easy technical fixes to our energy and climate problems,” Sovacool added. “This special collection strongly suggests otherwise—and Professor Dietz has been at the forefront of this thinking for many decades.” Dietz has been studying energy since the 1970s. He is known for his leadership of the behavioral wedge studies demonstrating that simple, money saving actions by households could reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by more than 7 percent. “The social sciences know a lot and we know what to do next to help with the climate and energy problems,” Dietz said. “But so far there is almost no funding. One estimate is that the United States invests less than 3 percent of the funds it puts into energy hardware research into social science energy research. But if technologies don’t get adopted and used, they don’t have any impact.” Stern is a member of the National Research Council and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Sovacool is a faculty member at the University of Sussex and Aarhus University. Dietz’s research is funded in part by MSU AgBioResearch.

Equipment

EPA announces Nutrient Recycling Challenge winners EPA announces Nutrient Recycling Challenge winners

  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced the winners of Phase I of the Nutrient Recycling Challenge, a competition to develop affordable technologies to recycle nutrients from livestock manure. In November 2015, EPA launched the Nutrient Recycling Challenge in partnership with pork and dairy producers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and environmental and scientific experts. The goal of the challenge is to find affordable technologies that can help farmers manage nutrients, create valuable products and protect the environment. The EPA received 75 concept papers from around the world and selected 34 submissions to continue on to Phase II of the challenge. EPA is awarding a total of $30,000 in cash prizes to the top 10 submissions (four winners and six honorable mentions). The following are descriptions of the four winning concepts: Slurry Separation with Coanda Effect Separator (by Ahimbisibwe Micheal of Bravespec Systems Ltd.) – Using centrifuge technology to separate smaller nutrient particles from manure, with fewer energy inputs and lower costs. Manure Convertor (by Ilan Levy of Paulee Cleantec Ltd.) – Using chemical processes to rapidly turn manure into a non-toxic, fertile ash fertilizer. Producing Nutrients Concentrated Bio-solids via AnSBEARs (by Bo Hu, Hongjian Lin, and Xin Zhang of the University of Minnesota) – Creating a dry biosolids fertilizer by using a novel anaerobic digestion and solid-liquid separation system. Removal of Dissolved N and P from Livestock Manure by Air Stripping (by Hiroko Yoshida of Centrisys Corporation) – Using CO2 stripping and other processes to create a range of fertilizers from anaerobically digested manure. The six honorable mentions included: Ammonia + Recovery (by Mark Capron and Rakesh Govind of Ocean Foresters and PRD Tech, Inc.) Azolla – Biological Way of Nutrient Recovery (by Tulika Arora of Wallenberg Laboratory) DVO, Inc. Advanced Phosphorus Recovery System (by Doug VanOrnum of DVO, Inc.) Nutrient Recycling by Lime Treatment and Precipitation of Inorganic Salts (by Jordan Phasey, Howard Fallowfield, and Dries Vandamme with Power and Water Corporation, Flinders University of South Australia, and KU Leuven – Belgium) Recycle Nutrients from Livestock Manure and Create Valuable Products (by Kerry Doyle, Tracey Mrak, Dr. Roa-Espinosa, and Richard Shatto with Trident Processes, LLC and Soil Net LLC) Production of Renewable Low Carbon Transportation Fuels and Nutrient Concentrated By-Products Through the AWS System (by Michael Bagtang, Bruce Scott, and Steve McCorkle with Agricultural Waste Solutions, Inc. and Scott Bros. Dairy Farms) Partners in the Nutrient Recycling Challenge include the American Biogas Council, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, Ben & Jerry’s, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Cooper Farms, CowPots, Dairy Farmers of America, Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy, Iowa State University, Marquette University, National Milk Producers Federation, National Pork Producers Council, Newtrient, LLC, Smithfield Foods, Tyson Foods, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Water Environment Research Federation, and the World Wildlife Fund. For more information, visit nutrientrecyclingchallenge.org.      

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