CPB is still a huge problem

CPB is still a huge problem

Colorado potato beetle (CPB) has been a challenging pest for potato growers for more than a century.

New options unveiled to unlock full power of canola meal for livestock

New options unveiled to unlock full power of canola meal for livestock

A new era of opportunity has emerged for Canadian canola meal as a premium, highly sought feed ingredient across livestock sectors around the world.

Guelph researchers making plant propagation cheaper and quicker

Guelph researchers making plant propagation cheaper and quicker

Dr. Praveen Saxena and Dr. Max Jones of the Gosling Research Institute for Plant Preservation (GRIPP) are leading work in micro-propagation.

Manitoba potato disease report: July 20

Manitoba potato disease report: July 20

There is no late blight reported in Manitoba, writes Vikram Bisht, with the potato and horticultural crops department at Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, in the latest potato disease report.

Dirt poor or soil rich?

Dirt poor or soil rich?

It’s no secret agricultural practices have changed over the years. Producers have moved away from livestock-based operations with perennial crops.

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For the first time ever, the North American Manure Expo is being hosted within a Canadian province. The annual show is being held August 20 and 21, 2013, at the University of Guelph’s Arkell Research Station, located near Guelph, Ontario. So, what's a Manure Expo and why should you attend? This video will provide all the dirt.
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Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitatio...
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The population explosion...
With the world's population increasing exponentially and farmland staying the same, BASF took to the streets to ask consumers if this trend is sustainable.

Sustainability

Results from a research project led by Thompson Rivers University's Dr. Lauchlan Fraser published in the journal Science recently. The paper lends support to a long-standing but controversial ecological hypothesis. New grasslands study has global reach

July 21, 2015 - Humans depend upon high levels of ecosystem biodiversity, but due to climate change and changes in land use, biodiversity loss is greater now than at any time in human history. Now, thanks to the findings in a recently published paper in Science, the world's leading journal for cutting-edge research, Thompson Rivers University's Dr. Lauchlan Fraser and his co-authors show a link between plant biomass and species richness in grassland ecosystems – the highest diversity is found at intermediate levels of plant biomass. The results of these findings have global ramifications for the management and conservation of biodiversity. In their paper, "Worldwide Evidence of a Unimodal Relationship Between Productivity and Plant Species Richness," Fraser designed the experiment and coordinated the efforts of 62 scientists from 19 countries and six continents. He describes the effort of collecting and analyzing the data as "Herculean." This project is part of "HerbDivNet," a network of scientist studying the relationships between plant biomass production and species diversity. "The project is exciting because it is such a broad international collaboration. We all went into this project on trust, on an idea." Ecosystem productivity, one factor considered responsible for regulating diversity, has long been a subject of debate. This new research is groundbreaking in that it reaffirms a previously held theory of biodiversity, and challenges a four-year-old article in Science that effectively disproved it. "The danger in the earlier paper was that it said there was no pattern. That could have thrown us off and we could have gone down rabbit holes looking for patterns. We wouldn't have come any closer to understanding biodiversity." With such a tremendous dataset to work from, Fraser is confident there are more discoveries to make. "This paper only scratches the surface. There are many more papers that are going to come out of this research and the network of researchers continues to grow," he says.  

Research

Results from a research project led by Thompson Rivers University's Dr. Lauchlan Fraser published in the journal Science recently. The paper lends support to a long-standing but controversial ecological hypothesis. New grasslands study has global reach

July 21, 2015 - Humans depend upon high levels of ecosystem biodiversity, but due to climate change and changes in land use, biodiversity loss is greater now than at any time in human history. Now, thanks to the findings in a recently published paper in Science, the world's leading journal for cutting-edge research, Thompson Rivers University's Dr. Lauchlan Fraser and his co-authors show a link between plant biomass and species richness in grassland ecosystems – the highest diversity is found at intermediate levels of plant biomass. The results of these findings have global ramifications for the management and conservation of biodiversity. In their paper, "Worldwide Evidence of a Unimodal Relationship Between Productivity and Plant Species Richness," Fraser designed the experiment and coordinated the efforts of 62 scientists from 19 countries and six continents. He describes the effort of collecting and analyzing the data as "Herculean." This project is part of "HerbDivNet," a network of scientist studying the relationships between plant biomass production and species diversity. "The project is exciting because it is such a broad international collaboration. We all went into this project on trust, on an idea." Ecosystem productivity, one factor considered responsible for regulating diversity, has long been a subject of debate. This new research is groundbreaking in that it reaffirms a previously held theory of biodiversity, and challenges a four-year-old article in Science that effectively disproved it. "The danger in the earlier paper was that it said there was no pattern. That could have thrown us off and we could have gone down rabbit holes looking for patterns. We wouldn't have come any closer to understanding biodiversity." With such a tremendous dataset to work from, Fraser is confident there are more discoveries to make. "This paper only scratches the surface. There are many more papers that are going to come out of this research and the network of researchers continues to grow," he says.  

Business/Policy

Calgary wine pro to be Canadian rep at international competition Calgary wine pro to be Canadian rep at international competition

July 28, 2015, Calgary, Alta – Peter Smolarz, fine wine director at Calgary’s Willow Park Wines & Spirits, has been selected to compete at the upcoming La Chaîne des Rôtisseurs International Jeunes Sommeliers Competition to be held in Adelaide, Australia on September 25, 2015. Smolarz currently manages Willow Park’s Bordeaux Futures Program; hosts events in wine, spirits & beer; conducts level 1 & 2 WSET education courses; and hosts tours in wine regions around the world. Prior to that, he was cellar master at Ranahans Members Restaurant in Calgary, providing Sommelier service, organizing the wine list, and training staff in wine and table service. He has also served “on the front lines” in all areas of the winery industry, travelling across the globe to places such as California, Washington, Argentina, Chile, Italy, Belgium, Australia and France to further his understanding in the methodology of wine production. In 2006, he worked the harvest in Chianti Classico, Tuscany, gaining hands-on experience at Tolaini Estate Winery – including harvesting grapes, testing maturation on vine, inoculation of yeast, handling push downs and pump overs during the wine making process, and even cleaning the winery. Now entering his tenth year in the wine industry, Smolarz has an extensive educational background including his WSET Level 3 Advanced Certificate; WSET Approved Programme Provider Level 1 & 2; Court of Master Sommeliers Level; French AOC certificate with Chateau Magnol and Spanish DO certificate with Marquis de Riscal. The Chaîne des Rôtisseurs is an international gastronomic society devoted to promoting fine dining and preserving the camaraderie and pleasures of the table. The society has both non-professional “gastronome” and culinary professional members in more than 75 countries around the world. The International Jeunes Sommeliers Competition, open to young professionals who have a pronounced interest and knowledge of wine and crafted beverages between the ages of 21 and 30, is hosted each year by La Chaîne des Rôtisseurs. Competitors from around the world are chosen through selection competitions held in their respective countries. Each competitor is tested in three areas: theory, service and blind tasting. “The steady composure that comes with self-confidence in the face of competitive situations can only happen when specialized knowledge is buttressed by passion and a love for the subject,” said Joseph Girard, chairman of the Jeunes Sommeliers Competition committee. “One of the most revealing aspects about the Jeunes Sommelier Competition was the dedication and skill that emanated from these contestants and witnessing how these young men and women displayed grace under pressure.”