Paradigm shifts

Paradigm shifts

MSU is conducting a multiyear investigation to explore the role of perennial bioenergy crops in supplying a host of services rising in demand.

Going the extra mile

Going the extra mile

Innovation goes a long way back at Heeman’s Strawberry Farm of Thorndale, Ont. – back more than five decades.

Establishing a windbreak that works

Establishing a windbreak that works

With the ever-increasing price of land, it can be very tempting to try to maximize production by cropping every possible inch of one’s acreage.

Dreaming big

Dreaming big

Can you change manure from a cost to manage to a prime revenue generator on the farm?

Making better pest spraying decisions

Making better pest spraying decisions

To spray or not to spray when you scout insect pests in the field, that is always a tough question.

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Honey Bee AirFLEX...
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North American Manure Expo comes to Canada...
For the first time ever, the North American Manure Expo is being hosted within a Canadian province. The annual show is being held August 20 and 21, 2013, at the University of Guelph’s Arkell Research Station, located near Guelph, Ontario. So, what's a Manure Expo and why should you attend? This video will provide all the dirt.
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Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitatio...
Expert Dr. Susan Watkins discusses Water Sanitation
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The population explosion...
With the world's population increasing exponentially and farmland staying the same, BASF took to the streets to ask consumers if this trend is sustainable.

Research

Two new oca varieties available Two new oca varieties available

April 20, 2015, Moclips, WA – Cultivariable, a breeder and retailer of Andean root vegetable crops, has released the first new varieties of oca bred for the North American climate. Oca (Oxalis tuberosa) is an Andean root vegetable traditionally grown from northern Argentina to Colombia in cool mountain climates. It is known as one of the "lost crops of the Incas," because, although it was originally cultivated alongside the potato, it was not adopted into European agriculture as the potato was. Although it is not a potato, oca is used and grown similarly to the potato and is often positioned as an alternative that is more disease resistant. The individual tubers are smaller, but yields are similar. Oca tubers come in a wide range of vivid colours, have thin waxy skins, and are often prepared whole, like new potatoes. The two new varieties, Redshift and Sockeye, were bred in coastal Washington state and selected based on their high yields, good flavour, and attractive colours. Sockeye has a tart flavour and a dense texture that has been compared to winter squash with lemon. Redshift has a non-acidic flavour that is similar to potato. These are the first new oca varieties bred specifically for the North American market. They were created using traditional plant breeding methods without any synthetic inputs, and have been released as open source varieties through the Open Source Seed Initiative. "Oca is a specialty crop that is starting to attract a lot of attention," said Cultivariable owner and vegetable breeder William Whitson. "Developing locally adapted varieties is a major step toward establishing oca as an important crop for our region. These new varieties are beautiful, have great flavour, and have performed very well for our trial growers using organic practices." In addition to original varieties, Cultivariable offers a wide selection of heirloom oca varieties and many other Andean root crops, such as yacon, maca, ulluco, mashua, and mauka. These crops are well suited to maritime climate regions in North America.