New Brunswick  - TJ Harvey

New Brunswick - TJ Harvey

Very few Canadian farmers schedule their farm projects around when the House of Commons is sitting in Ottawa. But that’s the case for New Brunswick egg farmer.

Heat causing two potato problems

Heat causing two potato problems

Two potato problems have developed due to high temperatures, writes Eugenia Banks in her latest Ontario potato update.

Quebec orchards worry blight could spell bad apple season

Quebec orchards worry blight could spell bad apple season

For apple farmer Mélanie Charbonneau, it's a worrying year for her Mont-Saint-Grégoire orchard.

Manitoba - The Froese Family

Manitoba - The Froese Family

Sometimes in life we have to wait for things, but they are worth it.

Accidents averted and kids alerted at Oxford’s farm safety days

Accidents averted and kids alerted at Oxford’s farm safety days

Progressive Agriculture Safety Days (PASDs) continue to grow each and every year.

video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 11, 2016...
Which glyphosate-resistant weed is most problematic to Ontario growers? Peter Sikkema answers this question and provides control and management strategies for dealing with glyphosate resistance in this exclusive interview from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 4, 2016...
How can farmers preserve the herbicides they are so dependant on? Neil Harker, a weed scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lacombe, Alta., suggests strategies to help slow down herbicide resistance in this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 27, 2016...
Jason Norsworthy, a professor in the department of crop, soil and environmental sciences at the University of Arkansas, spoke at the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit about the status of herbicide resistance in the United States. In this exclusive video, Norsworthy offers insight on the future of herbicide resistance, and suggestions for best management practices.
video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 20, 2016...
Harvest weed seed control is a management practice that has seen great success in Australia. In this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit, Breanne Tidemann and Michael Walsh discuss the potential for adapting this strategy to Canada, and the benefits and challenges of harvest weed seed control.

Energy

Dave Peterson, ADM for Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, kicked off the panel discussion. Fibre availability and access: challenges and opportunities

June 24, 2016 – One of the hottest topics for bioenergy producers, access and availability of fibre, took centre stage during an experts panel at the International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition in Prince George, B.C. Dave Peterson, ADM for Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, kicked off the panel discussion by discussing challenges and opportunities surrounding fibre availability and access. Peterson discussed the various fibre supply challenges in B.C., including a decline in availability of sawmill residuals; declining fibre harvesting; constantly changing market conditions; the economically availability access to residual fibre and society’s changing desires around environmental stewardship. He also touched upon the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan briefly, which includes recommendations for improving the harvesting of residuals through initiatives such as supplemental forest licenses for harvesting woody biomass. One of the ways Peterson said is being reviewed to help supply bioenergy producers with additional fibre is through wildfire management by clearing stands affected by wildfire or at high risk of wildfire. Peterson added that there’s still a lot of challenges related to securing economically viable fibre from the bush for secondary users. “In terms of harvest residuals, we’ve got a long way to go,” he said. “There’s lots of opportunities there… but only a small part of that opportunity is currently economic.” Rob McCurdy, CEO of Pinnacle Renewable Energy discussed the utilization of fibre for wood pellets and stressed the need for finding an economically sustainable way to harvest residuals in the bush.“How can we get that fibre and use it effectively?” he said. Pinnacle recently curtailed its pellet plant in Quesnel, B.C. due to a lack of fibre availability. The plant had been in operation since 1989 but was designed to produce pellets using sawmill residuals that are no longer available. McCurdy said his company is currently looking at ways to obtain a long-term fibre supply for the plant in a way that is economically viable so the company can justify investing the necessary upgrades to the facility to produce pellets using non-sawmill residuals. “The key is what is that fibre basket going to look like so we can put the capital back in and bring that plant back up again?” he said. McCurdy also touched on the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan, stating that the industry has not been able to find a way to translate the action plan into a sustainable supply of fibre for pellet plant producers.“We made a bold move in the province when we took the beehive burners out,” he said, adding that the industry now needs a bold move for harvesting residuals. June 16, 2016 – One of the hottest topics for bioenergy producers, access and available of fibre, took centre stage during an experts panel at the International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition in Prince George, B.C. Dave Peterson, ADM for Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, kicked off the panel discussion by discussing challenges and opportunities surrounding fibre availability and access. Peterson discussed the various fibre supply challenges in B.C., including a decline in availability of sawmill residuals; declining fibre harvesting; constantly changing market conditions; the economically availability access to residual fibre and society’s changing desires around environmental stewardship. He also touched upon the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan briefly, which includes recommendations for improving the harvesting of residuals through initiatives such as supplemental forest licenses for harvesting woody biomass. One of the ways Peterson said is being reviewed to help supply bioenergy producers with additional fibre is through wildfire management by clearing stands affected by wildfire or at high risk of wildfire. Peterson added that there’s still a lot of challenges related to securing economically viable fibre from the bush for secondary users. “In terms of harvest residuals, we’ve got a long way to go,” he said. “There’s lots of opportunities there… but only a small part of that opportunity is currently economic.” Rob McCurdy, CEO of Pinnacle Renewable Energy discussed the utilization of fibre for wood pellets and stressed the need for finding an economically sustainable way to harvest residuals in the bush. “How can we get that fibre and use it effectively?” he said. Pinnacle recently curtailed its pellet plant in Quesnel, B.C. due to a lack of fibre availability. The plant had been in operation since 1989 but was designed to produce pellets using sawmill residuals that are no longer available. McCurdy said his company is currently looking at ways to obtain a long-term fibre supply for the plant in a way that is economically viable so the company can justify investing the necessary upgrades to the facility to produce pellets using non-sawmill residuals. “The key is what is that fibre basket going to look like so we can put the capital back in and bring that plant back up again?” he said.  McCurdy also touched on the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan, stating that the industry has not been able to find a way to translate the action plan into a sustainable supply of fibre for pellet plant producers. “We made a bold move in the province when we took the beehive burners out,” he said, adding that the industry now needs a bold move for harvesting residuals. - See more at: http://www.canadianbiomassmagazine.ca/news/fibre-availability-and-access-challenges-and-opportunities-5751#sthash.8loI9kld.dpuf More coverage of the 2016 International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition: Prince George expands DES  Bioenergy, an industry in transition IBCE 2016 comes to Prince George Bioenergy sector's opportunities and challenges - See more at: http://www.canadianbiomassmagazine.ca/news/fibre-availability-and-access-challenges-and-opportunities-5751#sthash.8loI9kld.dpuf

Equipment

Manure Expo: Up close and personal Manure Expo: Up close and personal

July 20, 2016, London, Ohio – The 2016 North American Manure Expo – taking place August 3 and 4 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center near London, Ohio – provides the perfect opportunity for custom applicators and livestock producers to get up close and personal with the latest technology in manure handling, treatment and application. The key to Manure Expo is demonstrations and the 2016 event provides numerous opportunities for attendees to view side-by-side comparisons of equipment in action. On August 3, participants can view different kinds of equipment at work on various tour stops involved in beef and dairy production plus composting/nutrient management. The final visit of the day will showcase lagoon agitation equipment at work on a local dairy operation. On August 4, manure application demonstrations – including solid and liquid manure spreaders, compost turners, subsurface drainage plus spreader calibration – are planned. Nowhere else can the audience kick the tires in such a large, industry-specific forum. Registration for the North American Manure Expo is free (tours cost $20) and available online at manureexpo.org. Education sessions for the 2016 expo have been divided into specific areas of interest, including small farm manure management, cover crops, water quality initiatives and regulations, reducing phosphorous runoff, liquid and solid manure handling and application, manure safety and transport, anaerobic digestion, new technologies, and biosecurity procedures. Separate presentation areas have been designated around the expo grounds and sessions will be available at various scheduled times. Continuing education units (CEU) for Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois and Indiana have been approved for the majority of the education sessions, demonstrations and tours. They can be viewed here: http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/ocamm/images/CEU_summary.pdf. Another important element of Manure Expo is the one-of-a-kind trade show. More than 90 manufacturers and service providers will be exhibiting their wares, providing attendees an opportunity to talk to manufacturers, dealers and other experts in the manure industry. For more information on the 2016 North American Manure Expo, including a detailed agenda of tours and educational sessions plus directions to the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, please visit manureexpo.org.

Research

Ont. variety transforms asparagus industry Ont. variety transforms asparagus industry

July 21, 2016, Guelph, Ont – An asparagus variety developed at the University of Guelph has been a catalyst for growth that has transformed the Ontario asparagus sector. Developed by Prof. David Wolyn, Guelph Millennium has been on the market since 1997 and was recognized as Seed of the Year in 2005 for its longevity, extreme winter tolerance, and high yields of up to 9,000 pounds per acre – more than double that of previous varieties. READ MORE

AgAnnex Events

Saskatchewan Sunflower Field Day Wed Aug 03, 2016 @ 1:00pm - 04:00pm
Top Crop Events
Alliston Potato Festival Fri Aug 05, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Potatoes in Canada Events
2016 North American Manure Expo Wed Aug 03, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Manure Manager Events
2016 Potato Research Field Day Wed Aug 10, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Fruit & Vegetable Events
XXV World's Poultry Congress Mon Sep 05, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Canadian Poultry Events