Pawpaw: a tropical fruit that grows in Ontario

Pawpaw: a tropical fruit that grows in Ontario

Believe it or not, there’s a tropical fruit that thrives in Ontario.

Diesel from Dairy

Diesel from Dairy

Sustainability in farming is a phrase that’s used a lot these days. In its simplest form, it’s about continual operation with minimal impact on the environment.

Ontario offering production insurance to tender fruit growers

Ontario offering production insurance to tender fruit growers

Ontario is offering production insurance to tender fruit growers who lose their trees so they can feel confident in growing their businesses

Canadian mobile device offers instant dairy cow health check

Canadian mobile device offers instant dairy cow health check

Dairy Quality Inc. is a Queensville, Ont. company that prides itself on creating high tech solutions to meet dairy farming challenges.

Ont berry growers seek new organization

Ont berry growers seek new organization

Ontario’s two berry grower organizations are proposing to join forces and create one new organization.

video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 11, 2016...
Which glyphosate-resistant weed is most problematic to Ontario growers? Peter Sikkema answers this question and provides control and management strategies for dealing with glyphosate resistance in this exclusive interview from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 4, 2016...
How can farmers preserve the herbicides they are so dependant on? Neil Harker, a weed scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lacombe, Alta., suggests strategies to help slow down herbicide resistance in this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 27, 2016...
Jason Norsworthy, a professor in the department of crop, soil and environmental sciences at the University of Arkansas, spoke at the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit about the status of herbicide resistance in the United States. In this exclusive video, Norsworthy offers insight on the future of herbicide resistance, and suggestions for best management practices.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 20, 2016...
Harvest weed seed control is a management practice that has seen great success in Australia. In this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit, Breanne Tidemann and Michael Walsh discuss the potential for adapting this strategy to Canada, and the benefits and challenges of harvest weed seed control.

Production

Experiments show spray drift can injure wine grapes Experiments show spray drift can injure wine grapes

September 28, 2016, Lawrence, KS – A greenhouse experiment featured in the most recent issue of the journal Weed Technology shows that herbicide spray drift from the 2,4-D and dicamba can severely damage wine grapes planted near agronomic crops. As glyphosate-resistant broadleaf weeds like Palmer amaranth and horseweed have emerged in corn, soybean and other crops, 2,4-D and dicamba are being increasingly used to treat weeds that escape control. Grape growers and other specialty crop farmers have become concerned that increased use of 2,4-D and dicamba will result in crop losses from spray drift. To determine whether their concerns are warranted, researchers from Ohio State University conducted greenhouse experiments to simulate the impact of 2,4-D, dicamba and glyphosate spray drift on five economically important wine grape cultivars. Plants were evaluated at one week, 42 days and 357 days after treatment. Researchers found that 2,4-D and dicamba treatments, both with and without glyphosate, caused significant injuries to test plants. “We determined that spray drift from 2,4-D and dicamba can severely injure each of the five grape varieties in our study, with those injuries increasing with greater exposure,” says Mohsen Mohseni-Moghadam of Ohio State University, lead researcher for the study. “Simulated drift from glyphosate alone, though, produced only slight vine injury.” Full text of the article “Response of Wine Grape (Vitis spp.) Cultivars to Simulated Drift Rates of 2,4-D and Dicamba, and with/without Glyphosate” is now available in Weed Technology Vol. 30, Issue 3, July-September, 2016.

Protection

Tuber chaining, a type of second growth, can happen under high temperatures and water stress. Second growth disorder reported in Ontario

Sept. 29, 2016 – Second growth is a physiological potato problem induced by soil temperatures of 24 C or above and water stress. These two factors interact to limit the tuber growth rate, causing second growth. Inadequate soil moisture alone does not result in the initiation of second growth. Heat and drought prevailed during the 2016 Ontario growing season, which explains why second growth has been reported in some fields. Potato varieties differ in their susceptibility to second growth. European varieties appear to be more susceptible because they were bred and evaluated in countries where the growing seasons are rarely hot. There are three distinct types of second growth: Tuber chaining: A series of small tubers are produced on a single stolon. Heat sprouts: Sprouts develop from stolons or daughter tubers. The sprouts may emerge from the hills developing into leafy stems. Secondary Tuber: Small tubers form on daughter tubers. The secondary tubers are formed on short sprouts or directly on the tuber surface. This disorder is usually associated with physiologically old potatoes. High temperatures and water stress during the growing season are major factors contributing to the physiological aging of potatoes. Cultural practices that promote uniform growth of plants and tubers throughout the season help minimize second growth. Among them are: ● Do not plant physiologically old seed in cold, dry soil. ● Space seed pieces as uniformly as possible at planting. ● Apply an adequate amount of fertilizers. ● Maintain uniform soil moisture sufficient to meet crop needs (this was easier said than done this past season!).