Dan and Chelsea Erlandson chosen as Saskatchewan’s Outstanding Young Farmers for 2016

Dan and Chelsea Erlandson chosen as Saskatchewan’s Outstanding Young Farmers for 2016

Vegetable farmers Dan and Chelsea Erlandson of Outlook, Sask., named the 2016 Outstanding Young Farmers (OYF) for the Saskatchewan Region.

Crying Foul Over Spent Fowl Imports

Crying Foul Over Spent Fowl Imports

Spent fowl imports have again returned to suspiciously high levels and imports in the first quarter of 2016 are the highest ever

Dickeya is coming

Dickeya is coming

Potato growers are familiar with the problems that stem from blackleg and are adept at managing it. However, two new strains have been identified and one has been spreading in North America for the last two years.

Warming climate =  new pest threat?

Warming climate = new pest threat?

The pollen beetle may look like a cute little bug, but it’s one of Alberta’s “most unwanted” pests.

Rethinking stink about antibiotics in manure

Rethinking stink about antibiotics in manure

Antibiotics and manure. You probably don’t think of them at the same time. But across North America, manure and antibiotics often share the same pile.

video
Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 11, 2016...
Which glyphosate-resistant weed is most problematic to Ontario growers? Peter Sikkema answers this question and provides control and management strategies for dealing with glyphosate resistance in this exclusive interview from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 May 4, 2016...
How can farmers preserve the herbicides they are so dependant on? Neil Harker, a weed scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Lacombe, Alta., suggests strategies to help slow down herbicide resistance in this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 27, 2016...
Jason Norsworthy, a professor in the department of crop, soil and environmental sciences at the University of Arkansas, spoke at the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit about the status of herbicide resistance in the United States. In this exclusive video, Norsworthy offers insight on the future of herbicide resistance, and suggestions for best management practices.
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Herbicide Resistance Summit 2016 April 20, 2016...
Harvest weed seed control is a management practice that has seen great success in Australia. In this week’s exclusive video from the 2016 Herbicide Resistance Summit, Breanne Tidemann and Michael Walsh discuss the potential for adapting this strategy to Canada, and the benefits and challenges of harvest weed seed control.

Energy

Dave Peterson, ADM for Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, kicked off the panel discussion. Fibre availability and access: challenges and opportunities

June 24, 2016 – One of the hottest topics for bioenergy producers, access and availability of fibre, took centre stage during an experts panel at the International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition in Prince George, B.C. Dave Peterson, ADM for Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, kicked off the panel discussion by discussing challenges and opportunities surrounding fibre availability and access. Peterson discussed the various fibre supply challenges in B.C., including a decline in availability of sawmill residuals; declining fibre harvesting; constantly changing market conditions; the economically availability access to residual fibre and society’s changing desires around environmental stewardship. He also touched upon the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan briefly, which includes recommendations for improving the harvesting of residuals through initiatives such as supplemental forest licenses for harvesting woody biomass. One of the ways Peterson said is being reviewed to help supply bioenergy producers with additional fibre is through wildfire management by clearing stands affected by wildfire or at high risk of wildfire. Peterson added that there’s still a lot of challenges related to securing economically viable fibre from the bush for secondary users. “In terms of harvest residuals, we’ve got a long way to go,” he said. “There’s lots of opportunities there… but only a small part of that opportunity is currently economic.” Rob McCurdy, CEO of Pinnacle Renewable Energy discussed the utilization of fibre for wood pellets and stressed the need for finding an economically sustainable way to harvest residuals in the bush.“How can we get that fibre and use it effectively?” he said. Pinnacle recently curtailed its pellet plant in Quesnel, B.C. due to a lack of fibre availability. The plant had been in operation since 1989 but was designed to produce pellets using sawmill residuals that are no longer available. McCurdy said his company is currently looking at ways to obtain a long-term fibre supply for the plant in a way that is economically viable so the company can justify investing the necessary upgrades to the facility to produce pellets using non-sawmill residuals. “The key is what is that fibre basket going to look like so we can put the capital back in and bring that plant back up again?” he said. McCurdy also touched on the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan, stating that the industry has not been able to find a way to translate the action plan into a sustainable supply of fibre for pellet plant producers.“We made a bold move in the province when we took the beehive burners out,” he said, adding that the industry now needs a bold move for harvesting residuals. June 16, 2016 – One of the hottest topics for bioenergy producers, access and available of fibre, took centre stage during an experts panel at the International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition in Prince George, B.C. Dave Peterson, ADM for Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, kicked off the panel discussion by discussing challenges and opportunities surrounding fibre availability and access. Peterson discussed the various fibre supply challenges in B.C., including a decline in availability of sawmill residuals; declining fibre harvesting; constantly changing market conditions; the economically availability access to residual fibre and society’s changing desires around environmental stewardship. He also touched upon the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan briefly, which includes recommendations for improving the harvesting of residuals through initiatives such as supplemental forest licenses for harvesting woody biomass. One of the ways Peterson said is being reviewed to help supply bioenergy producers with additional fibre is through wildfire management by clearing stands affected by wildfire or at high risk of wildfire. Peterson added that there’s still a lot of challenges related to securing economically viable fibre from the bush for secondary users. “In terms of harvest residuals, we’ve got a long way to go,” he said. “There’s lots of opportunities there… but only a small part of that opportunity is currently economic.” Rob McCurdy, CEO of Pinnacle Renewable Energy discussed the utilization of fibre for wood pellets and stressed the need for finding an economically sustainable way to harvest residuals in the bush. “How can we get that fibre and use it effectively?” he said. Pinnacle recently curtailed its pellet plant in Quesnel, B.C. due to a lack of fibre availability. The plant had been in operation since 1989 but was designed to produce pellets using sawmill residuals that are no longer available. McCurdy said his company is currently looking at ways to obtain a long-term fibre supply for the plant in a way that is economically viable so the company can justify investing the necessary upgrades to the facility to produce pellets using non-sawmill residuals. “The key is what is that fibre basket going to look like so we can put the capital back in and bring that plant back up again?” he said.  McCurdy also touched on the 13-point Forest Fibre Action Plan, stating that the industry has not been able to find a way to translate the action plan into a sustainable supply of fibre for pellet plant producers. “We made a bold move in the province when we took the beehive burners out,” he said, adding that the industry now needs a bold move for harvesting residuals. - See more at: http://www.canadianbiomassmagazine.ca/news/fibre-availability-and-access-challenges-and-opportunities-5751#sthash.8loI9kld.dpuf More coverage of the 2016 International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition: Prince George expands DES  Bioenergy, an industry in transition IBCE 2016 comes to Prince George Bioenergy sector's opportunities and challenges - See more at: http://www.canadianbiomassmagazine.ca/news/fibre-availability-and-access-challenges-and-opportunities-5751#sthash.8loI9kld.dpuf

Production

Fruit spray extends shelf life by 50 per cent Fruit spray extends shelf life by 50 per cent

June 24, 2016, Guelph, Ont – An all-natural spray, developed by University of Guelph researcher Jay Subramanian and his team of scientists, could do wonders to reduce food waste and enhance food security by extending the shelf life of fruit by up to 50 per cent. The spray uses a nanotechnology-based application of hexanal, a natural plant extract that prevents fruit spoilage. READ MORE

AgAnnex Events

canolaPALOOZA Alberta Tue Jun 28, 2016 @ 8:30am - 04:30pm
Top Crop Events
2016 North American Manure Expo Wed Aug 03, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Manure Manager Events